Succeed or Fail with Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell

1. Put in your time (practice, practice, practice). (aka Gladwell’s 10000 hours rule, from his book “Outliers”)

2. Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else’s head – even if in the end you conclude that someone else’s head is not a place you’d really like to be. (Preface to preface to What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures)

3. When you write a book, you need to have more than an interesting story. You need to have a desire to tell the story. You need to be personally invested in some way. If you’re going to live with something for two years, three years, the rest of your life, you need to care about it. (from A Few Thin Slices of Malcolm Gladwell)

From Wikipedia:

Malcolm T. Gladwell, CM (born September 3, 1963) is a British-Canadian journalist, bestselling author, and speaker. He is currently based in New York City and has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. He has written four books, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference (2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005), Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), and What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures (2009), a collection of his journalism. All four books were New York Times Bestsellers.

Gladwell’s books and articles often deal with the unexpected implications of research in the social sciences and make frequent and extended use of academic work, particularly in the areas of sociology, psychology, and social psychology. Gladwell was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011.

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